Reading Comprehension 10

1. READ TEXT QUICKLY AND SIGN DIFFICULT WORDS

The Acacia, a genus of trees and shrubs of the mimosa family that originated in Australia, has long been used there in building simple mud and stick structures. The Acacia is called a wattle in Australia, and the structures are said to be made of daub and wattle. The Acacia is actually related to the family of plants known as legumes that includes peas, beans, lentils, peanuts, and pods with beanlike seeds. Some Acacia actually produce edible crops. Other Acacia varieties are valued for the sticky resin, called gum Arabic or perfumes, for the dark dense wood prized for making pianos, or for the bark, rich in tannin, a dark, acidic substance used to cure the hides of animals, transforming them into leather.

Nearly five hundred species of Acacia have been analyzed, identified, categorized, and proven capable of survival in hot and generally arid parts of the world; however, only a dozen of the three hundred Australian varieties thrive in the southern United States. Most acacia imports are low spreading trees, but of these, only three flower, including the Bailey Acacia with fernlike silver leaves and small, fragrant flowers arranged in rounded clusters, the Silver Wattle, similar to the Bailey Acacia, which grows twice as high, and the squat Sidney Golden Wattle, bushy with broad, flat leaves, showy bright yellow blossoms, and sharp spined twigs. Another variety, the Black Acacia, also called the Blackwood, has dark green foliage and unobtrusive blossoms. Besides being a popular ornamental tree, the Black Acacia is considered valuable for its dark wood, which is used in making furniture, as well as highly prized musical instruments.

The Acacia’s unusual custom of blossoming in February has been commonly attributed to its Australian origins, as if the date and not the quality of light made the difference for a tree in its flowering cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, the seasons are reversed, and February, which is wintertime in the United States, is summertime in Australia. Actually, however, the pale, yellow blossoms appear in August in Australia. Whether growing in the lovely acacia blossoms in winter.

2. NEW VOCABULARY WITH THEIR MEANING

  • Shrubs : a woody plant smaller than a tree, usually having multiple permanentstemsbranching from or near the ground.
  • Mimosa : any of numerous plants, shrubs, or trees belonging to the genusMimosa,of the legume family, native to tropical or warm regions,having small flowers inglobular heads or cylindrical spikes and oftensensitive leaves.
  • Mud : wet, soft earth or earthy matter, as on the ground after rain, at thebottom of apond, or along the banks of a river; mire.
  • Stick : a branch or shoot of a tree or shrub that has been cut or broken off.
  • Daub : to cover or coat with soft, adhesive matter, as plaster or mud
  • Wattle : Often, wattles. a number of rods or stakes interwoven with twigs ortreebranches for making fences, walls, etc.
  • Legumes : any plant of the legume family, especially those used for feed, food, orasa soil-improving crop.
  • Lentils : a plant, Lens culinaris, of the legume family, having flattened,biconvexseeds used as food.
  • Pods : a somewhat elongated, two-valved seed vessel, as that of the pea orbean.
  • Sticky resin : the substance obtained by tapping Rubber Wood logs with a Treetap, and is rarely dropped when chopping Rubber Wood down.
  • Gum Arabic : a water-soluble, gummy exudate obtained from the acaciatree,especially Acacia senegal, used as an emulsifier, an adhesive, in inks,and inpharmaceuticals.
  • Prized : to estimate the worth or value of.
  • Bark : the external covering of the woody stems, branches, and roots ofplants, asdistinct and separable from the wood itself.
  • Leather : an article made of this material.
  • Arid : barren or unproductive because of lack of moisture
  • Thrive : to prosper; be fortunate or successful.
  • Spreading : to draw, stretch, or open out, especially over a flat surface, assomethingrolled or folded (often followed by out).
  • Fernlike : any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, oftropicalto temperate regions, characterized by true roots producedfrom a rhizome, triangularfronds that uncoil upward and have abranching vein system, and reproduction byspores contained insporangia that appear as brown dots on the underside of thefronds.
  • Clusters : a number of things of the same kind, growing or held together; abunch
  • Squat : to settle on or occupy property, especially otherwise unoccupiedproperty,without any title, right, or payment of rent.
  • Bushy : resembling a bush; thick and shaggy
  • Foliage : the leaves of a plant, collectively; leafage.
  • Unobtrusive : not obtrusive; inconspicuous, unassertive, or reticent.
  • Ornamental : used or grown for ornament
  • Attributed : to regard as resulting from a specified cause; consider as causedbysomething indicated (usually followed by to)
  • Hemisphere : (often initial capital letter) half of the terrestrial globe or celestialsphere,especially one of the halves into which the earth is divided.
  • Reversed : opposite or contrary in position, direction, order, or character

3. THE IDEAS OF EACH PARAGRAPH

  • Paragraph one : The Acacia, a genus of trees and shrubs of the mimosa family that originated in Australia, has long been used there in building simple mud and stick structures. The structures are said to be made of daub and wattle. The Acacia is actually related to the family of plants known as legumes. Some Acacia actually produce edible crops.
  • Paragraph two : Nearly five hundred species of Acacia have been analyzed, identified, categorized, and proven capable of survival in hot and generally arid parts of the world.
  • Paragraph three : The Acacia’s unusual custom of blossoming in February has been commonly attributed to its Australian origins, as if the date and not the quality of light made the difference for a tree in its flowering cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, the seasons are reversed, and February, which is wintertime in the United States, is summertime in Australia.

4. ANSWER FROM THE QUESTIONS GIVEN

1. With which of the following topics in the passage primarily concerned?

  • A. The black acacia
  • B. Characteristic and varieties of the acacia
  • C. Australian varieties of the acacia
  • D. The use of acacia wood in ornamental furniture

2. How many species of acacia grow well in the southern united states?

  • A. Five hundred
  • B. Three hundred
  • C. Twelve
  • D. Three

3. The word thrive paragraph 2 is closest in meaning to which of the following?

  • A. Grow well
  • B. Are found
  • C. Were planted
  • D. Can live

4. The word these in paragraph 2 refers to ?

  • A. United states
  • B. Varieties
  • C. Species
  • D. Trees and shrubs

5. According to this passage, the silver wattle ?

  • A. Is squat and bushy
  • B. Has unobtrusive blossoms.
  • C. Is taller than the bailey acacia
  • D. Is used for making furniture

6. In paragraph 2, the word flat most nearly means ?

  • A. Smooth
  • B. Pretty
  • C. Pointed
  • D. Short

7. The word showy in paragraph 2 could best be replaced by ?

  • A. Strange
  • B. Elaborate
  • C. Huge
  • D. Fragile

8. Which of the following acacias has the least colorful blossoms?

  • A. Bailey acacia
  • B. Sidney golden wattle
  • C. Silver wattle
  • D. Black acacia

9. Which of the following would most probably be made from a black acacia tree?

  • A. A flower arrangement
  • B. A table
  • C. A pie
  • D. Paper

10. When do acacia trees bloom in australia?

  • A. February
  • B. Summer
  • C. August
  • D. Spring

5. SUMMARY OF THE PASSAGE

The Acacia, a genus of trees and shrubs of the mimosa family that originated in Australia, has long been used there in building simple mud and stick structures. The structures are said to be made of daub and wattle. The Acacia is actually related to the family of plants known as legumes. Some Acacia actually produce edible crops. Nearly five hundred species of Acacia have been analyzed, identified, categorized, and proven capable of survival in hot and generally arid parts of the world.

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